Palms Post: July 2008

July 2008 cover
As Palms Australia approaches its Golden Jubilee Celebration, Palms Post takes a look back at the origins of the Paulian Association and stories from the first three decades; a reminder of our current emphasis on open hands; and, a look to the future, both through research into approaches to volunteering and a call for ongoing membership and new directors for our board.

View the Complete July 2008 Palms Post here (792 kB)
or read individual articles by following the links below.

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Continuing the Paulian Vision

By truly making the effort to recognise his captors as people who shared the universal need for understanding, acceptance and care, Roy was able to get past the more superficial divisions that had been the main cause of the conflict.

Executive Director’s Report

If we “open our hands to the world” like this we are adopting a posture that will enable us to successfully live by Palms values, achieve Palms vision, or accomplish the three threads of the Palms mission.

Update – Research into Volunteering

Nichole’s doctoral research will provide important insights into the role that cross-national volunteers play in sustainable development projects.

Opening our hands to the world

As we come to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of the Paulian Association, we also reflect upon the rich memories and achievements of Palms volunteers and supporters: people who have shared their gifts and lives with the world over the past five decades.

Beyond July: What comes after World Youth Day?

Given that World Youth Day will be upon us very soon, now is a great time to consider how the experience will affect Australians beyond July 2008.

Re-Entry: Living cross-culturally presents a mix of emotions.

To our amazement, it has been quite difficult settling back into our culture and Palms, with their wealth of experience and the re-entry programme, have assisted and supported us along this path.”


There is much more to doing good work than "making a difference." There is the principle of first do no harm.
There is the idea that those who are being helped ought to be consulted over the matters that concern them. - Teju Cole