Where do we work?: Solomon Islands

Population: 595,613

Area: 28,450 sq. km.

Median Age: 19.7

Literacy: 76.6 %

Languages: Solomon Pidgin, English, 120 indigenous languages

The UK established a protectorate over the Solomon Islands in the 1890s. Some of the bitterest fighting of World War II occurred on this archipelago. Self-government was achieved in 1976 and independence two years later. Ethnic violence, government malfeasance, and endemic crime have undermined stability and civil society.

In June 2003, Prime Minister Sir Allen Kemakeza sought the assistance of Australia in re-establishing law and order; the following month, an Australian-led multinational force arrived to restore peace and disarm ethnic militias. The Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) has been very effective in restoring law and order and rebuilding government institutions.

In 2007, a tsunami hit the Solomon Islands town of Gizo and many surrounding villages. Many villages were completely destroyed by the wave. Some islanders are already experiencing the effects of rising sea levels due to climate change.

Current Volunteers   Recent Volunteers
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Below are some profiles of volunteers who have recently completed their placements in Hila Sukkar volunteering in Solomon Islands.

hila

Hila Sukkar

Hila Sukkar is volunteering as a teacher and trainer in Nila, Gizo and Wagina, Solomon Islands.


Hila Sukkar volunteering in Solomon Islands

July 6, 2010

hila

Hila Sukkar is volunteering as a teacher and trainer in Nila, Gizo and Wagina, Solomon Islands.


Palms Poet – Little Children

September 23, 2006

A poem by Hila Sukkar, Palms volunteer in Gizo, Nila and Wagina, Solomon Islands


Hila Sukkar’s CommUNITY News no. 1

August 12, 2006

Music, light and even food are becoming luxuries, or should I say special treats on Nila. I look forward to certain days of the week when I know we have enough diesel to run the generator so that we can have power, and hence, light and active powerpoints – music!


Pat Campbell’s Letter From The Field

March 12, 2005

After spending time to understand the culture, the people and language, it is now like being at home where, when you observe, you do not just see the images but the bigger picture, who is who, what they are doing and why.



There is much more to doing good work than "making a difference." There is the principle of first do no harm.
There is the idea that those who are being helped ought to be consulted over the matters that concern them. - Teju Cole