Where do we work?: Ethiopia

ethiopia

Population: 85,237,338

Area: 1,104,300 sq. km.

Median Age: 16.9

Literacy: 42.7 %

Languages: Amharic, Oromo, Tigrinya, Somali

Ethiopia is a proudly independent country. One of the few African countries never colonised by Europeans, aside from a brief occupation by Italian forces prior to the second World War. The major religion is Ethiopian Orthodox, although a significant number of the population belong to Islam or the Protestant churches.

Ethiopia’s most famous leader, Emperor Haile Selassie ruled for over 40 years (including the Italian occupation).  The drought and famine of the early 70s contributed to the Emperor’s overthrow and the installation of a Marxist junta which ruled until 1991. Eritrea gained independence in 1993, but there has remained some dispute over the border region.

Ethiopia’s most famous export is coffee, which was first discovered in this country. Despite the huge value of the global coffee industry (second only as a commodity to oil) Ethiopian producers often still receive very little for their work. Farmers are still often affected by drought and poor nutrition is common.

Current Volunteers   Recent Volunteers
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Below are some profiles of volunteers currently working in Ethiopia.

claire-michalanney

Claire Michalanney

Claire Michalanney, a registered nurse from Adelaide, volunteered with Bushulo Health Centre in Ethiopia from 2011 to 2013.


Supporting African Initiative

August 10, 2012

Fulvio and Wogeni fix a cabinet at Holy Family Care Centre, Bushulo, Ethiopia

Each field visit provides the great privilege of meeting our partners and being reminded that our volunteers are only a tiny part of a long-term development story which is driven by Africans. It is a terrific reminder of what Palms Australia is all about – supporting local initiative.


Bushulo Health Centre

Adelaide nurse and administrator Claire Michalanney with Dr Ayelew, Acting Medical Director at Bushulo Health Centre.

The Safe Motherhood outreach program has reduced the number of maternal deaths in the villages. My role has been to help improve the quality of nursing care in the hospital, assist with the management of pharmaceutical supplies and to provide support for the Administrator in the management of this complex range of services.


Variety in volunteering

August 29, 2011

As a small nimble organisation, Palms is able to respond to different circumstances in a way that many larger NGOs may not. In recent years, we have been nothing if not innovative, with Encounters, Reverse Immersions, Fair Trade and three-way partnerships providing examples of innovative ways to complement our core work.


Fulvio Fabreschi volunteering in Ethiopia

July 28, 2011

fulvio

Fulvio Fabreschi, a Financial Planner from Sydney, has volunteered to work with Bushulo Health Centre in Ethiopia.


Claire Michalanney volunteering in Ethiopia

claire-michalanney

Claire Michalanney, a registered nurse from Adelaide, volunteered with Bushulo Health Centre in Ethiopia from 2011 to 2013.


Nurse; Midwife

February 17, 2011

Nurse; Midwife for health centre in Ethiopia Nurse to work with other nursing staff to improve skills Midwife to assist in and be responsible for the management of the obstetrics ward in collaboration with other staff Minimum 12-month placement.


Maintenance Person

October 6, 2010

A rural health centre in Ethiopia has asked Palms Australia to help locate a tradesperson with broad maintenance skills to assist repair and maintain its ageing facilities. The successful applicant will work with local staff at this rural health centre to pass on maintenance skills so that the community is empowered to maintain their own […]


Below are some of the volunteer positions Palms Australia is seeking to fill in . To find out more about any position or about other opportunities, please enquire about volunteering with Palms Australia.


There is much more to doing good work than "making a difference." There is the principle of first do no harm.
There is the idea that those who are being helped ought to be consulted over the matters that concern them. - Teju Cole